defect


defect
01. Thousands of cars are being recalled due to a [defect] in the steering system.
02. The accident was caused by a [defect] in the landing gear of the airplane.
03. My brother had a slight hearing [defect] which was corrected with a hearing-aid.
04. A number of athletes from the communist bloc [defected] to Canada after the Montreal Olympics.
05. The [defection] of an important North Korean politician has made headlines around the world.
06. Any merchandise which is [defective] can be returned for a full refund.
07. All goods are guaranteed to be free of [defects] for a period of one year.
08. He was born with a [defect] in his heart and has to take it very easy.
09. Some kinds of cancer are caused by inherited [defects] in DNA repair mechanisms.
10. Chemical pollution in the local water supply is being blamed for the high incidence of birth [defects] in the area.
11. We were able to buy these jeans at half the regular price because they have some very minor [defects].
12. Any [defectors] from that country will be given immediate political asylum.
13. Francois de Salignac Fenelon once noted that children are excellent observers, and will often perceive your slightest [defects].
14. Ralph Waldo Emerson once observed that no change of circumstances can repair a [defect] of character.
15. There is a Sanskrit proverb which observes that they know not their own [defects] who search for the [defects] of others.
16. Bubbles in champagne were seen by early wine makers as a highly undesirable [defect] to be prevented.
17. In the 1500s, the Catholic church underwent great changes in response to the [defection] of the English to the Church of England.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • defect — de·fect / dē ˌfekt, di fekt/ n: something or a lack of something that results in incompleteness, inadequacy, or imperfection: as a: a flaw in something (as a product) esp. that creates an unreasonable risk of harm in its normal use see also… …   Law dictionary

  • defect — DEFÉCT, Ă, defecţi, te, s.n., adj. 1. s.n. Lipsă, scădere, imperfecţiune materială, fizică sau morală; cusur, meteahnă, neajuns, beteşug, hibă. ♦ Deranjament, stricăciune care împiedică funcţionarea unei maşini, a unui aparat. ♦ Ceea ce nu este… …   Dicționar Român

  • Defect — Defect, defects, or defected may refer to: Geometry and physical sciences Defect (geometry), a characteristic of a polyhedron Topological defect Isoperimetric defect Crystallographic defect, a structural imperfection in a crystal Biology and… …   Wikipedia

  • Defect — De*fect , n. [L. defectus, fr. deficere, defectum, to desert, fail, be wanting; de + facere to make, do. See {Fact}, {Feat}, and cf. {Deficit}.] 1. Want or absence of something necessary for completeness or perfection; deficiency; opposed to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • defect — Ⅰ. defect [1] ► NOUN ▪ a shortcoming, imperfection, or lack. ORIGIN Latin defectus, from deficere desert or fail . Ⅱ. defect [2] ► VERB ▪ abandon one s country or cause in favour of an opposing one …   English terms dictionary

  • defect — [dē′fekt΄; ] also, and for v. always [, dē fekt′, difekt′] n. [ME < L defectus < deficere, to undo, fail < de , from + facere, to DO1] 1. lack of something necessary for completeness; deficiency; shortcoming 2. an imperfection or… …   English World dictionary

  • Defect — De*fect , v. t. To injure; to damage. None can my life defect. [R.] Troubles of Q. Elizabeth (1639). [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Defect — Defect, lat., mangelhaft; als Hauptwort D., Mangel, Gebrechen; defectiren, eine Rechnung untersuchen in Beziehung auf Rechnungsfehler; defectiv, was defect. – Defectbogen, im Buchhandel ein nachverlangter Bogen. – Defecte, in der Buchdruckerei… …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • defect — (n.) early 15c., from M.Fr. defect and directly from L. defectus failure, revolt, falling away, from pp. of deficere to fail, desert (see DEFICIENT (Cf. deficient)). As a verb, from 1570s. Related: Defected; defecting …   Etymology dictionary

  • defect — [n] blemish, imperfection birthmark, blot, blotch, break, bug, catch, check, crack, deficiency, deformity, discoloration, drawback, error, failing, fault, flaw, foible, frailty, gap, glitch, gremlin, hole, infirmity, injury, irregularity, kink,… …   New thesaurus

  • Defect — De*fect , v. i. To fail; to become deficient. [Obs.] Defected honor. Warner. [1913 Webster] 2. to abandon one country or faction, and join another. [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English